Our Story

The story of Krebsallianz

Krebsallianz can look back over a decade of providing treatments and care for those affected by cancer and other non communicable diseases. 

Founded by Robert Landry with its HQ in Berlin, Krebsallianz is one of the largest German charities providing cancer treatment and support for people in the developing world. 

The first donation projects began in Nicaragua and Honduras with larger pharmaceutical companies donating chemotherapies and essential medicines. By 2008 Krebsallianz had expanded its partner base in central and southern America to Guatemala, Belize, Dominican Republic, Paraguay and Peru. The types of donations we received enabled us to help many cancer sufferers as well as people suffering from other non communicable diseases such as haemophilia. 

Krebsallianz focuses on children suffering from cancer in the developing world and in 2008 it extended its support to cancer research, receiving two grants. One was donated to a project at the Centre for Children’s Cancer in Hamburg. The project focused on chromosome aberrations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. The second grant went to a Regensburg based project group who research innovative diagnosis methods of a rare brain tumors (atypical teratoide Rhabdoid tumor), which affects babies and younger children. 

On top of the donations and funding for research Krebsallianz also began supporting kik Cancer Counselling Services in Cologne. Kik takes care of families who have been affected by cancer by organising day trips for kids, awareness projects, rehabilitation, and after-care services.

By 2010 Krebsallianz had expanded with a new partners in Moldova, the Philippines and Ghana. Moldova is one of the poorest countries in Europe and has many difficulties obtaining even essential medicines. The project in the Philippines was in collaboration with Asia America Initiative and Genzyme. Genzyme has commited itself to give life-long support to people who are suffering from two chronic diseases, Gaucher and Pompe. Gaucher is a rare genetic enzyme deficiency that causes organ enlargement and bone pain. If left untreated patients have a very limited life span. People suffering from Pompe disease suffer muscle and nerve damage due to a build up of glycogen, affecting organs such as the heart and liver. The enzyme treatment donated by Genzyme keeps suffers of these diseases alive. 

In Kumasi, Ghana, Dr. Beatrice Wiafi has made it her mission to spread awareness about breast cancer throughout Ghana. She is the founder and president of Breast Care International (BCI), an organisation which offers breast screenings, breast cancer awareness campaigns, diagnosis, advice, treatment and rehabilitation. Alongside the numerous medicinal donation from Krebsallianz, in 2013 we also supported a BCI run cancer nurse training programme. 70 nurses from across Ghana were invited to come and learn from the charismatic cancer surgeon at the Peace and Love hospital in Kumasi. 

In more recent years Krebsallianz has begun treating individual cases. Our partners from the Domincan Republic came to us with a request for a donation of Herceptin for Dinanyoris Toribo. Luckily we were able to receive this donation from Roche and pass on the medicines to her. A second individual case is Petrea Sirbu who is suffering from Leukemia (ALL). While visiting our partners Coram Deo in Chisinau, Moldova we were approached by his mother asking for help. She desperately needed Oncaspar for the continuation of Petrea’s treatment, a very expensive and sought-after chemotherapy drug. We received a kind donation and were able to give Petrea the treatment he needed! 

Krebsallianz has committed itself to help those most in need and our efforts have all been made possible through our donors. Thank you for your consistent support!

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Orden de Malta Guatemala Krebsallianz's Partner

Orden de Malta Guatemala Krebsallianz's Partner

The mission to help the sick and the needy. Following its historic mission to help the sick, the needy and the most disadvantaged in society, the Order of Malta continues its work today, operating in more than 120 countries. Its programmes include medical and social assistance.